If you show someone the ropes, you teach or explain to them how to do a particular job.

In this expression: ropes = basic methods, or the way something is done.
Someone "learning the ropes" is being taught the basics.
Someone who "knows the ropes" is familiar or experienced - and could "show the ropes" to someone else!


Examples:

1. Luckily, my colleague showed me the ropes until I figured out that new project.

2. When we are not sure the usage of English grammar, Ensie shows us the ropes all the time.

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Origin

A nautical term, from the days of sailing ships when new recruits had to learn how to tie knots and which rope hauled up which sail. After which of course they would know the ropes.
Thanks for your clear explanation on it, Frank.
Dear Ensie,
You are modest and nice to show the ropes to us where mistakes we may make. I appreciate it.

Thank you Grace and Frank for explaining the meaning of this expression.

I'll take note of it.

somebody show me the ropes of live!
Sometimes I get depressed of how literature genre analysis is difficult then I ask the teacher to show me the ropes.
I'll never forget my teacher's efforts in showing me the ropes to effective academic writing.

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