Once upon a time I met a word. It was quite long ago and I forgot the word. I tried to remember it many times but with no success. Now the desire to find the word is more like an obsession. I know the word exists but what it is I can't recollect even vaguely. The Net also hasn't helped me, because it's not easy to ask Google or other search engine about it. It is especially irritating because the behavior the word is used to describe is quite common. And as far as I'm concerned no Russian word does it better. I know one Russian word but it's rather informal, while the English I'm looking for is formal and pleasantly sophisticated and lengthy.

What is the word about? Imagine a woman (even better women) who holds in her hands or is in the immediate vicinity of something cute, small, fluffy, and adorable, like a young puppy. Sure her speech (the words, the intonations) would become immediately quite peculiar and specific. The word I'm looking for describes that manner of speech precisely.

Do you know this word? If you do please tell me what it is which would made me extremely grateful because I'm still looking for it.

Tags: adorable, fluffy, vocabulary, woman, word

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Replies to This Discussion

I believe that everybody can make there a think to the world. If all people make the right and are solidarity with others this world can change. If return us good for evil, if we has to hope in a new day, if we are watching a violent movie change us of channel. We should choice the piece by warn. I think that this is a way to begin to change the world.
Hi, Vova! I don't know what Carolina is about but I will try to help you. Do you mean to be over-sweet with someone? Being a Russian speaker I can recall only one word "сюсюкать". Do you mean that? If so, English is " to be gooey with". This word can be also used if we mean man-and woman relationship but in this case it will not be a positive characteristic of a woman. It means, she is too sweet, i.e., sticky sweet. Will you tell me the Russian word, please, if you mean something different?
Dear Tanya,

You got the meaning right. And the Russian verb you mentioned is the only one I know in Russian to describe the behavior. It is informal however as well as "gooey" which also has another drawback -- it is an adjective (that's why we need a phrase to use it to describe the behavior) while the word which I know exists in English and what I'm looking for is a verb and it is formal. I dimly remember that the dictionary article about it says something like mimicking the childish speech. That's all I could recollect

Tanya said:
Hi, Vova! I don't know what Carolina is about but I will try to help you. Do you mean to be over-sweet with someone? Being a Russian speaker I can recall only one word "сюсюкать". Do you mean that? If so, English is " to be gooey with". This word can be also used if we mean man-and woman relationship but in this case it will not be a positive characteristic of a woman. It means, she is too sweet, i.e., sticky sweet. Will you tell me the Russian word, please, if you mean something different?
Dear Vova! You may mean "to lisp". It is exactly what you have described, i.e., imitating childish speech. As a matter of fact "to be gooey" is rather formal. It is not a slang word.

Vladimir V. Z. said:
Dear Tanya,

You got the meaning right. And the Russian verb you mentioned is the only one I know in Russian to describe the behavior. It is informal however as well as "gooey" which also has another drawback -- it is an adjective (that's why we need a phrase to use it to describe the behavior) while the word which I know exists in English and what I'm looking for is a verb and it is formal. I dimly remember that the dictionary article about it says something like mimicking the childish speech. That's all I could recollect

Tanya said:
Hi, Vova! I don't know what Carolina is about but I will try to help you. Do you mean to be over-sweet with someone? Being a Russian speaker I can recall only one word "сюсюкать". Do you mean that? If so, English is " to be gooey with". This word can be also used if we mean man-and woman relationship but in this case it will not be a positive characteristic of a woman. It means, she is too sweet, i.e., sticky sweet. Will you tell me the Russian word, please, if you mean something different?
Dear Tanya,

If it was "lisp" I would gladly say "yes" because we naturally associate "yes" with appreciation (what I feel towards your efforts to help me), while "no" sounds rather rude. Unfortunately it is not. I know the word "lisp" very well besides it being the name of my favorite programming language. To my knowledge "lisp" means a speech defect what we call in Russian "шепелявить". Still I'm not giving up but will continue searching the elusive word which is rather lengthy, at least eight letters.

Tanya said:
Dear Vova! You may mean "to lisp". It is exactly what you have described, i.e., imitating childish speech. As a matter of fact "to be gooey" is rather formal. It is not a slang word.

Vladimir V. Z. said:
Dear Tanya,

You got the meaning right. And the Russian verb you mentioned is the only one I know in Russian to describe the behavior. It is informal however as well as "gooey" which also has another drawback -- it is an adjective (that's why we need a phrase to use it to describe the behavior) while the word which I know exists in English and what I'm looking for is a verb and it is formal. I dimly remember that the dictionary article about it says something like mimicking the childish speech. That's all I could recollect

Tanya said:
Hi, Vova! I don't know what Carolina is about but I will try to help you. Do you mean to be over-sweet with someone? Being a Russian speaker I can recall only one word "сюсюкать". Do you mean that? If so, English is " to be gooey with". This word can be also used if we mean man-and woman relationship but in this case it will not be a positive characteristic of a woman. It means, she is too sweet, i.e., sticky sweet. Will you tell me the Russian word, please, if you mean something different?
Ok, Vlad, I just want to help. But "to lisp" is not only "шепелявить". It also means imitate childish speech. If you know, we Russian speakers say that English is a lispy language and we are right because of English prononciation. I will ask Americans about that word.

Vladimir V. Z. said:
Dear Tanya,

If it was "lisp" I would gladly say "yes" because we naturally associate "yes" with appreciation (what I feel towards your efforts to help me), while "no" sounds rather rude. Unfortunately it is not. I know the word "lisp" very well besides it being the name of my favorite programming language. To my knowledge "lisp" means a speech defect what we call in Russian "шепелявить". Still I'm not giving up but will continue searching the elusive word which is rather lengthy, at least eight letters.

Tanya said:
Dear Vova! You may mean "to lisp". It is exactly what you have described, i.e., imitating childish speech. As a matter of fact "to be gooey" is rather formal. It is not a slang word.

Vladimir V. Z. said:
Dear Tanya,

You got the meaning right. And the Russian verb you mentioned is the only one I know in Russian to describe the behavior. It is informal however as well as "gooey" which also has another drawback -- it is an adjective (that's why we need a phrase to use it to describe the behavior) while the word which I know exists in English and what I'm looking for is a verb and it is formal. I dimly remember that the dictionary article about it says something like mimicking the childish speech. That's all I could recollect

Tanya said:
Hi, Vova! I don't know what Carolina is about but I will try to help you. Do you mean to be over-sweet with someone? Being a Russian speaker I can recall only one word "сюсюкать". Do you mean that? If so, English is " to be gooey with". This word can be also used if we mean man-and woman relationship but in this case it will not be a positive characteristic of a woman. It means, she is too sweet, i.e., sticky sweet. Will you tell me the Russian word, please, if you mean something different?
Hi, Vlad! Here is me again. The following is the answer I got from an American:

Speaking of expressions, concerning your question, we say somebody is doing or making baby-talk. I am sure you are very familiar with how we so easily make new expressions by adding nouns to do or make. It's along the same line as do the laundry, do lunch, do a movie, do homework or make the bed, make a mistake, etc., When the baby itself makes intelligible sounds we say the baby coos or babbles. I never know who is sillier, the baby or the adult doing baby-talk.
Dear Tanya,

I'm beginning to feel myself guilty to trouble you that much. "baby-talk" might be used but it does not describe the behavior (manner of speech) precisely enough. Small children also do "baby-talk" though they don't imitate nothing, for them it is genuine. While the key point for the word in question is to emphasize the presence of imitation, temporarily acquired manner of speech, acquired at will. I myself would endure only a very few short seconds of such talk. After that I have to find a refuge immediately and if I didn't very grieve consequences to my health are inevitable.

Tanya said:
Hi, Vlad! Here is me again. The following is the answer I got from an American:

Speaking of expressions, concerning your question, we say somebody is doing or making baby-talk. I am sure you are very familiar with how we so easily make new expressions by adding nouns to do or make. It's along the same line as do the laundry, do lunch, do a movie, do homework or make the bed, make a mistake, etc., When the baby itself makes intelligible sounds we say the baby coos or babbles. I never know who is sillier, the baby or the adult doing baby-talk.
Dear Volodya! It is OK. You got my interest. Let me ask British if Americans can't answer.

Vladimir V. Z. said:
Dear Tanya,
I'm beginning to feel myself guilty to trouble you that much. "baby-talk" might be used but it does not describe the behavior (manner of speech) precisely enough. Small children also do "baby-talk" though they don't imitate nothing, for them it is genuine. While the key point for the word in question is to emphasize the presence of imitation, temporarily acquired manner of speech, acquired at will. I myself would endure only a very few short seconds of such talk. After that I have to find a refuge immediately and if I didn't very grieve consequences to my health are inevitable.
Tanya said:
Hi, Vlad! Here is me again. The following is the answer I got from an American:

Speaking of expressions, concerning your question, we say somebody is doing or making baby-talk. I am sure you are very familiar with how we so easily make new expressions by adding nouns to do or make. It's along the same line as do the laundry, do lunch, do a movie, do homework or make the bed, make a mistake, etc., When the baby itself makes intelligible sounds we say the baby coos or babbles. I never know who is sillier, the baby or the adult doing baby-talk.
Hi, Vladimer! The following is the answer given by a British:

The only words that spring to mind are "baby talk" or "cooing".

Tanya said:
Dear Volodya! It is OK. You got my interest. Let me ask British if Americans can't answer.

Vladimir V. Z. said:
Dear Tanya,
I'm beginning to feel myself guilty to trouble you that much. "baby-talk" might be used but it does not describe the behavior (manner of speech) precisely enough. Small children also do "baby-talk" though they don't imitate nothing, for them it is genuine. While the key point for the word in question is to emphasize the presence of imitation, temporarily acquired manner of speech, acquired at will. I myself would endure only a very few short seconds of such talk. After that I have to find a refuge immediately and if I didn't very grieve consequences to my health are inevitable.
Tanya said:
Hi, Vlad! Here is me again. The following is the answer I got from an American:

Speaking of expressions, concerning your question, we say somebody is doing or making baby-talk. I am sure you are very familiar with how we so easily make new expressions by adding nouns to do or make. It's along the same line as do the laundry, do lunch, do a movie, do homework or make the bed, make a mistake, etc., When the baby itself makes intelligible sounds we say the baby coos or babbles. I never know who is sillier, the baby or the adult doing baby-talk.
Dear Tanya,

Not it is the question of honor for me to prove that I was neither insane nor dreaming when I read the word. And it would be a strange thing indeed to dream the word no one ever used or heard. Don't you think so? I'm trying to remember the book where I met it. Now I have three positions on my list:
- Gerald Durrell Catch Me a Colobus
- Karen Pryor Don't shoot the dog
- Karen Pryor Lads Before the Wind
I'm skimming the second item on the list now and so far I haven't found it there yet. It's a pity I don't have English texts of the other two.

Tanya said:
Hi, Vladimer! The following is the answer given by a British:

The only words that spring to mind are "baby talk" or "cooing".

Tanya said:
Dear Volodya! It is OK. You got my interest. Let me ask British if Americans can't answer.

Vladimir V. Z. said:
Dear Tanya,
I'm beginning to feel myself guilty to trouble you that much. "baby-talk" might be used but it does not describe the behavior (manner of speech) precisely enough. Small children also do "baby-talk" though they don't imitate nothing, for them it is genuine. While the key point for the word in question is to emphasize the presence of imitation, temporarily acquired manner of speech, acquired at will. I myself would endure only a very few short seconds of such talk. After that I have to find a refuge immediately and if I didn't very grieve consequences to my health are inevitable.
Tanya said:
Hi, Vlad! Here is me again. The following is the answer I got from an American:

Speaking of expressions, concerning your question, we say somebody is doing or making baby-talk. I am sure you are very familiar with how we so easily make new expressions by adding nouns to do or make. It's along the same line as do the laundry, do lunch, do a movie, do homework or make the bed, make a mistake, etc., When the baby itself makes intelligible sounds we say the baby coos or babbles. I never know who is sillier, the baby or the adult doing baby-talk.
Hello All,

I found the book where the situation is described in which my word (what the word is I described in my original post in this discussion) might be used. The book is 'A Zoo In My Luggage' by Gerald Durrell. The paragraph before the last of the second chapter of the book - 'Bald birds'. I said 'might be' because I'm not sure the word I'm looking for was actually used there. I don't have the book in English only Russian translation. If you have in your possession that book, wouldn't it be too much to ask you to quote here the paragraph in question? I hope it would be profitable for anyone interested in words.

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